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Sarah’s springboard

Published on 05/26/2014 in Testimonials

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Sarah, 28 years old is a comedian and dancer with Down Syndrome and will soon be leaving on a tour around Great-Britain, Ireland and Frankfurt. She was one of the heroin of the “Dear Future Mom” video.

The end of year show is often a source of anxiety for children: having hundreds of eyes staring is never pleasant. For Sarah, this is the best memory she has of being at school. Sarah always felt like she was in the right place. She felt so good that she used to comfort her little friends who were stressed out. At five years old, Sarah had found her place: on stage.

Sarah LF88 1Starting a career as a comedian is never an easy thing. You need to have this little something special that makes you shine among the other candidates. This little something, Sarah has it. This little something is a supernumerary chromosome 21.

When some people tell her that this chromosome could be an obstacle to her artistic aspirations, she does not see where the problem is. Her place is on stage. She will therefore be found on stage.

Sarah still carried on performing on stage in her school and when she turned 19 was asked, by two producers, to play a part in a series for the British television. Moving from the school stage to the cameras of a national television channel? No problem.

SArah LF88 2Being noticed on TV opened the doors to more important projects for her. One of the scriptwriters of the series offered her the lead role in a dance show. Once again, Sarah took on the challenge even though the project has enough to impress even the most experienced dancers: to dance on a circular stage surrounded by 800 people. However Sarah has a way of her own to master her fear. During rehearsals she uses her free time at lunch to step on stage and dance alone, her eyes closed. And when asked how the opening night went, she answers with a laugh: “I was at home on stage! I already knew the stage off by heart, why would I have been afraid?”              

The projects follow on, one after another: pictures, shows, advertising campaigns. She very naturally accepted to put her talent at the service of the Dear Future Mom campaign which came out on the 21st of March.

Sarah is, indeed, well conscious of the luck of having such a talent and that most people with Down Syndrome will never get to do all these things.

But as her mother puts it so well, for Sarah, the most important thing is to remind everyone that behind the disease, there is a person, with dreams, talents and aspirations, the same as anyone else. 



 

 



 

 

 

 

 

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